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JLPT N5 Kanji A Day - Kanji: 二 ni two

KANJI-A-DAY

DAY TWO

Write. Read. Learn


Welcome to TheJapanShop.com's Kanji-a-Day blog postToday, let's take a look at the stroke order of kanji.

You may want to copy this post to reference down the road. While these rules aren't hard and fast, they will help you make educated guesses with unknown characters.

There are good reasons to remember the correct stroke order from the very beginning:

1)    By following the set order, kanji will look more like it should and therefore be easier to read.
2)    You can remember new kanji better by knowing the order to write them.
3)    Kanji dictionaries often list kanji by stroke number.
4)    Kanji is an art form in Japan and they will know when you cheat!


If you only have time to remember one thing, get this:
START FROM THE TOP-LEFT OF THE KANJI AND WORK DOWN TO THE BOTTOM-RIGHT.



RULE #1 : From top to bottom

RULE #2 : From left to right

And when you have both a vertical and horizontal go horizontal first.

But it wouldn’t be fun without exceptions!

RULE #3 : If you have left, right, and center options, work from the center.

RULE #4 : If there is an outside bit surrounding an inside bit, the outside comes first.

Except when the outside is shaped like a “C”

RULE #5 : If there is a vertical line going through other parts, it comes last or at least later.

And if there is a horizontal line that overlaps other parts, it goes last.

RULE #6 : If there is an “X” or a crossing of diagonals the top-right to bottom-left goes first.

RULE #7 : If there is a it goes last:


And now... Today's Kanji:

Two lines = two, logical!; a little harder, but don’t run for the aspirin yet!)

JLPT N5: 2 / 100 | 2 Strokes

On: ニ
Kun: ふた・つ
Meaning: two; 2


Two lines make Two!

STROKE ORDER:

ni—two

To listen its audio sample please follow this link here  for Kanji: 二 ni two

EXAMPLE:

ni—two
第二 dai ni—the second
二月ni gatsuFebruary [the 2nd month]


EXAMPLE SENTENCE:


フロリダの12月は暑いですか?
furorida no juunigatsu wa atsui desu ka?
Is December in Florida pretty hot?

[Foreign (non-Japan) place names and people’s names are written in katakana unless there is a kanji for the name.]


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